2014 Statistics

TV Statistics | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

Women comprised 1.9% of directors on the top 100 films

In the top 100 films, women represented 12% of protagonists

74% of all female characters in the top 100 films were white. 11% of female characters were black, 4% were Latina, 4% were Asian, 3% were otherworldly, and 4% were of another race or ethnicity

Women Onscreen

Top 100 grossing films:

  • Women represented 30% of all speaking characters, 29% of major characters, 12% of protagonists, and 13% of leaders. 
  • Male characters were more likely than females to be identified only by a work related role (61% of males vs. 34% of females). 
  • Female characters were more likely than males to be identified only by a personal life-related role (58% of females vs. 31% of males). 
  • The majority of women are in their 20s and 30s, while men are in their 30s and 40s. 
  • Males over 40 made up 53% of all male characters, while females over 40 made up 30% of all female characters. 
  • 74% of female characters were white. 11% were black, 4% were Latina, 4% were Asian, 3% were otherworldly, and 4% were of another race or ethnicity.

Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film

Top 100 grossing films, 2007-2014:

  • Females represented just 30.2% of all speaking characters (2011 excluded).
  • No female actors over 45 years of age were in a lead/co-lead role.
  • Only three of the female actors in lead/co-lead roles were from underrepresented racial/ethnic backgrounds.
  • No female leads/co-leads were lesbian or bisexual characters.
  • Less than a quarter of all speaking characters in the top animated films were female. Only 21.8% of speaking characters in action/adventure films were female.
  • Females of all ages were more likely than males to be shown in sexy attire (27.9% of females vs. 8% of males), with some nudity (26.4% of females vs. 9.1% of males), or referenced as physically attractive (12.6% of females vs. 3.1% of males).
  • Female teens (13‐20 year olds) were just as likely to be sexualized as young adult females (21‐39 year olds). Middle‐aged females (40‐64 year olds) were less likely to be sexualized.
  • Only 11% of the films were gender-balanced.
  • 21 films in 2014 had a female lead/co-lead. Only three of the leads/co-leads were played by underrepresented female actors.

Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative USC 

Women Behind the Scenes

Top 250 grossing films:

  • Women were 17% of the directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors.
  • Women directed 7% of the films.
  • Women wrote 11% of the movies.
  • Women comprised 19% of all executive producers.
  • Women accounted for 23% of all producers.
  • Women comprised 18% of all editors.
  • Women accounted for 5% of all cinematographers.
  • Women comprised 1% of all composers.
  • Women comprised 5% of sound designers.
  • Women accounted for 5% of all supervising sound editors.

Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film

Top 100 grossing films:

  • Women comprised only 15.8% of directors, writers, and producers.
  • Women only accounted for 1.9% of directors, 11.2% of writers, and 18.9% of producers.
  • Only two women directed across the 100 top films.

Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative USC 

2009-2014 Women Directors in the Studio System:

  • Sony Pictures Entertainment – 8.7%
  • Universal Pictures – 7.5%
  • Twentieth Century Fox – 7.1%
  • Walt Disney Studios – 6.1 %
  • Paramount Pictures – 4.7%
  • Warner Bros. – 2.3%

Los Angeles Times